Vegetarian Thanksgiving Recipes
Vegetarian Thanksgiving Recipes Vegetarian Thanksgiving Recipes

Vegetarian Thanksgiving Recipes


This is the week each year I get asked for vegetarian thanksgiving recipe ideas, so I thought I'd update my list of favorite recipes and ideas from the archives. I've also added a few recipes I've come across on other sites that looked exciting. It's also the time of year I like to re-read this. I hope those of you celebrating Thanksgiving this week have a wonderful time with friends, and loved ones. xo -h

Roasted Vegetable Orzo - Roasted delicata squash and kale tossed w/ orzo pasta & salted yogurt dressing.

A Favorite Pie - You could do apple-huckleberry, straight berries, pear-cranberry, etc.

Golden-Crusted Brussels Sprouts - A quick and easy brussels sprouts recipe that will convert the biggest skeptics. Vibrant green, tender brussels sprouts that become deeply golden and crusty where they touch the pan, dusted with cheese.

Heirloom Apple Salad - heirloom apples, shaved celery, and toasted nuts of your choosing. The dressing is crème fraîche spiked with rosemary, garlic and champagne vinegar.

Roasted Delicata Squash Salad - So tasty! Pretty, scalloped-edged cross-cuts of the delicata squash, a few small potatoes, chopped kale, radishes, Marcona almonds - and a bold miso harissa dressing.

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Rye Pasta
Rye Pasta Rye Pasta

Rye Pasta


My little Marcato Atlas pasta machine has been out on the counter for the past couple of weeks. It is compact, stout, heavy for its size, and manual. I've had it for more than ten years, but perhaps less than fifteen. And it teaches me lessons about making pasta that I forget and have to relearn each time there is an extended gap in our time together (of which there are many). I like to use the Atlas to make egg pasta - "00" flour enriched with an impossible number of electric yellow egg yolks, good for fettuccine and tagliatelle. But I've switched things up the past few days and have been rolling thin rye pasta. It's a nice option for the winter months, it freezes well (so I can make a lot in one go), and you can drop tangles of the noodles into a range of restorative winter broths...Continue>>

 
 
Maintaining a Long-term Blog
Maintaining a Long-term Blog Maintaining a Long-term Blog

Maintaining a Long-term Blog


I've been posting to this site for a dozen years. I was twenty-nine when I started, an enthusiastic home cook with a creative streak, and a good number of cookbooks. You could probably describe me in much the same way now, but older, with a bit more perspective and better knives. Over the years I've been asked many questions - both via email, and in person - many of them curious about the process of writing cookbooks, or having a site like this. So, I thought I'd attempt a slightly different type of post today - exploring the theme of maintaining a blog over an extended time period. It's something I feel is important to my life and creative process for reasons you might expect, but perhaps some that you don't.

I look forward to creating something new here each week. Sometimes the content is quick and fast, other times deeper. It's not something I've come to think of as a chore, or something I feel obligated to do to sustain a readership. I come at it each week with positivity. And it's this aspect that seems to genuinely surprise some people. Which, in turn, surprises me.

Here's how I approach this site, and have for a long time...

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Coconut Quinoa Bowl
Coconut Quinoa Bowl Coconut Quinoa Bowl

Coconut Quinoa Bowl


I'm looking at the photo I'm posting here, and realizing it looks like a good number of bowls I've posted in the past. But the photo doesn't tell the whole story, so I hope you'll look at it with fresh eyes. What you're looking at is a quirky, unique bowl of quinoa, with a couple of secrets. And the next time you have leftover quinoa (other other favorite grain) give it a try. You toast almonds and coconut in a skillet before adding crushed garlic. Then use the same skillet to flash cook a bit of kale, finishing it off with a dousing of lemon juice. Everything comes together in a bowl with avocado and salted yogurt...Continue>>

 
 
Beet Caviar
Beet Caviar Beet Caviar

Beet Caviar


I'm lucky to be the occasional recipient of Josey Baker experimentations. The other day Josey handed me a still-hot loaf of 100% einkorn bread - substantial, fragrant, a dark brown crumb with a craggy top-crust. It smelled like a great brewery - all malt, and grain, and warmth. And it begged to be treated right. The first question to come to mind was slicing strategy...the consensus was: 1) Allow the bread to cool completely. 2) With this loaf - not too thick, not too thin. Not to digress too much, but when it comes to toast, the thickness or thinness of the slice is key. Some breads lend themselves to a thick slab - Blue Bottle Cafe (in downtown San Francisco) cooks an egg-in-the hole of Acme's pain de mie. Perfect. There are other breads I like thinly sliced and extra-toasted - Josey's rye comes to mind, also Anna's Daughters' Rye - a beautifully distinctive local bread. Once this was sorted, Josey got on with his afternoon, and I started thinking about what I'd eventually put on the bread. Silvena Rowe's book had been in my bag for a few days, I was reading it when I was on the bus, or waiting on a coffee. So I started paging through, and settled on a beet spread I knew would be beautiful - the sweet earthiness of the roasted beets accented with toasted walnuts, chives, dates, a bit of booziness, and a swirl of creme fraiche.Continue>>

 
 
Favorites List (10.17.14)

Favorites List (10.17.14)


I've been waking up on the early side lately, and tend to do a bit of reading before the sun rises. Which means, I have a few things to share with you. Also, if any of you have any podcasts you're particularly excited about, give a shout in the comments. I'd love to add a few to my list...

- Reading this, and reading this.

- Watching this, and this.

- Honey hunters

- Armchair traveling: here, here, here, and here

- The Interpreter

- Find Your Beach

- Lotta + Oaxaca

- Rise & Shine

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Spicy Chickpea and Bulgur Soup
Spicy Chickpea and Bulgur Soup Spicy Chickpea and Bulgur Soup

Spicy Chickpea and Bulgur Soup


I'm deep in the middle of a streak where I cook primarily from other people's cookbooks. Every now and then it's a groove I fall into, sometimes lasting a few weeks, other times a month or two. There's something creatively energizing, and at the same time, relaxing about following a recipe written by another cook or writer I admire. I like to mix it up a bit by alternating between recipes from new volumes (like the one today), and recipes from older titles (the Sopa Verde from last week). It's a practice that tends to shake out the creative cobwebs for me. So, that's where my head was at when I turned to a stack of books the other night. I was asked to bring a soup for a group of friends getting together for a casual, coastal overnight in beautiful west Marin. There were a number of recipes that were contenders, but a spicy chickpea soup from Yotam Ottolenghi's upcoming cookbook, Plenty More, caught my attention. It features a seductive, red harissa broth fragrant with cumin, coriander, and caraway, and enough chickpeas and bulgur to make it work as a main course. An herb-whipped feta is the crowning dollop...Continue>>

 
 
 
 

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